Raymond Chandler

A l’âge de 70 ans, Raymond Chandler écrivit son roman « Playback », c’est connu. Ce qui n’est possiblement pas connu, c’est qu’avant qu’il n’écrive ce roman, à l’époque où il se trouvait dans l’emploi d’Universal Studios, il avait écrit un script.« Playback ».  Attention : Bien que M. Chandler ait écrit le scénario, ce n’est pas un récit Philip Marlowe.

Malheureusement, « The suits » (les cadres) n’aimaient pas le script, et le film n’a jamais été tourné.

Deçu par la reception mitigée de son scénario, M. Chandler l’avait complètement changé en un roman Marlowe comme ça. Allez donc comprendre !

S’il t’intéresse pourtant, tu peux télécharger le script gratuitement ici :

http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/playback

(en angliche, bien entendu).

Bonne lecture !

Le goret qui rit, C. M. Albrecht http://theinvestigators.webs.com

 

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Raymond Chandler

<strong><span style=”font-size:small;”>A</span></strong> l’âge de 70 ans, Raymond Chandler écrivit son roman « Playback », c’est connu. Ce qui n’est <a href=”https://cmalbrecht.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/r-chandler2.jpg”><img class=”alignright size-full wp-image-398″ title=”R. Chandler” src=”https://cmalbrecht.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/r-chandler2.jpg&#8221; alt=”” width=”187″ height=”269″ /></a>possiblement pas connu, c’est qu’avant qu’il n’écrive ce roman, à l’époque où il se trouvait dans l’emploi d’Universal Studios, il avait écrit un script.« Playback ».  Attention : Bien que M. Chandler ait écrit le scénario, ce n’est pas un récit Philip Marlowe.

Malheureusement, « The suits » (les cadres) n’aimaient pas le script, et le film n’a jamais été tourné.

Deçu par la reception mitigée de son scénario, M. Chandler l’avait complètement changé en un roman Marlowe comme ça. Allez donc comprendre !

S’il t’intéresse pourtant, tu peux télécharger le script gratuitement ici :

http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/playback (en angliches, bien entendu) Bonne lecture !

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Film Talk

                                                                                                                                                                                ImageEven if you’ve never seen “Gone with the Wind” (maybe you’ve been kept prisoner for seventy-odd years in an oubliette beneath a crumbling French castle), you’ve certainly heard that Clark Gable line: “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn!”

I know you recognize: “Go ahead, make my day,” uttered by Clint Eastwood in “Sudden Impact”. And of course, “I’ll be back.” Mr. Schwarzenegger has said it so many times even Bruce Willis told him to give it a rest in “Expendables 2”.

These are indeed memorable, and so well-known that most people do remember them, and the movies were memorable as well.

But we all have certain lines that stay with us. Here are some others, some from really good movies and some from movies that should never have been made, but good or bad, a few lines just stand out, at least to me.

“We’re going back to the tick tock and get the boo boo.” (Sen. Fred Thompson, “Baby’s Day Out” 1994) (My personal favorite.)

“I’m walking here! I’m walking here!” (Dustin Hoffman, “Midnight Cowboy” 1969)

“What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate.” (Strother Martin, “Cool Hand Luke 1967)

“Nobody leaves this place without singing the blues.” (Albert Collins, “Adventures in Babysitting”1987)

“I’ll have what she’s having.” (Estelle Reiner, “When Harry met Sally”1989)

“You had me at hello.” (Renée Zellweiger, “Jerry Maguire” 1996)

“The Duck of Death,” (Gene Hackman, “Unforgiven” 1992)

“I saw everything!” (Peter McNichol, “Dracula: Dead and Loving It” 1995)

“—  Eye-ventory.” Strother Martin, “Fools’ Parade”1971)

“Yeah, well right now Sister Lyda’s ass is dragging.” (Kim Novak, “The Great Bank Robbery”1969)

“Don’t say sir to me. I’m a sergeant. I work for a living.” (Warren Oates, “Stripes”1981)

“After all…tomorrow is another day.” Vivien Leigh “Gone with the Wind”1939)

“I never was no good at sharing.” (George Kennedy, “Fools’ Parade”, 1971)

“The, uh, stuff dreams are made of.” (Humphrey Bogart, “The Maltese Falcon” 1941)

I’m sure there are others that will come to mind from time to time, so this list is undoubtedly far from complete. I realize some of these lines may not appeal to everyone, and everyone probably has his/her own favorites, so this is of necessity very subjective.

If you have any favorites, insert them into a comment along with the details, i.e. title, speaker, date, etc. Thanks.

A Good Story…

A number of years ago I sat with my granddaughter, age 4 or 5, while we watched “Zootsuit” with that electrifying El Pachuco performance by Mr. Olmos. In fact the entire film was electrifying.

Pretty heavy stuff for a little kid, you may say, but I didn’t see any reason she couldn’t see the film. Since I was the babysitter, I had little choice. Either not watch, send her to bed, or let her watch. I’m easy.

We both sat entranced throughout the entire film, but at the end she suddenly burst out crying.

“What’s the matter?” I asked. “Why are you crying?”

She wiped her eyes and took a moment before she said, “Because I didn’t want it to be over.”

That got me thinking about my own feelings. Some stories make you want to stay with them all the way. You’re really not ready for them to “be over”.

I’ve read some of my favorite books several times, I suppose because that’s as close as I can get to having them not “be over”.

This morning I read a comment about how tedious Moby Dick is, and how the commentator couldn’t get past the first few pages. I remember my own yeoman struggle to get through the entire book. My thinking was that if it’s so damned famous, it must be worth reading. So I read it. It is a powerful story set against a strange and wonderful background. But tedious, yes. Tedious? More like absolute murder. Especially for today’s reader.

But continuing my wandering thought processes, I thought of other books that are considered classics. They mostly have one thing in common: they’re long and meandering. But then it occurred to me that readers of a hundred or so years ago, having no radio or TV or movies, spent a lot more time reading. And I believe they wanted their money’s worth when they picked up a book. They wanted a book that would engross them not just for an hour or two, but one that would be a companion for perhaps a week or more. Life was slower in those times, and there were fewer distractions for the average person. Reading obviously provided the best part of a person’s solitary amusement and education. Small wonder then that when people in those days got their hands on a good book, they didn’t want it to “be over” too soon.

These days, if we wrote in those dated styles, we’d get a rejection that would out speed  a Voyager spacecraft.

Today you have to start with a “hook” to get the reader involved, and then you’d better keep going. No pulp fiction padding these days when being paid by the word is meaningless. At one time a penny a word could bring in $50 which wasn’t peanuts. Today, too many outlets are wise to the fact that they don’t have to pay anything at all.

There are always exceptions to the good story rule however.

Like many kids, at one time I thought it would be great to join the French Foreign Legion. After all I’d seen “Beau Geste” and “Flying Deuces”. I seem to remember some French film where Jean Gabin hid out in the Spanish Foreign Legion which was patterned after the French model.

Well, I just finished “Legionnaire” by Simon Murray. This romantic 19-year old joined La Légion Etrangère and spent five years undergoing torture that makes Guantanamo Bay look like an expense-paid vacation in the Bahamas. Luckily for us, he kept a pretty close diary. Imagine walking for hours with a bag of rocks for a backpack with wire shoulder straps, digging a “grave” and lying in it beneath a tarp in the Algerian sun all day long without water. How about a twenty-five mile march wearing full gear in the heart of the Sahara summer and coming back to find that while you were gone, everything in the barracks had been thrown onto the floor, including taking the beds apart, throwing soap powder over the entire mess and soaking it in water. Then your company was told there would be inspection in two hours. How about letting a tank knock you down and roll over you without getting smashed, or parachuting into the unknown in the middle of the night. These were but some of the toughening episodes Mr. Murray survived during his five-year stint. Sure, life in the Legion had its moments, but they were few and far between. I have to admit that while I really lived that adventure, this is one in which I was glad for it to “be over”.

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