Rules of Writing

I sent an early crime novel to a publisher who had already published one of my novels, but she rejected it, saying that, in a mystery, the victim is only there to provide a puzzle for the reader. Therefore, I should bump somebody — anybody — off in the first few pages and devote the rest of the novel to the investigation whether it be by police detectives, a private detective, or an amateur sleuth. Carefully following her own advice, she rejected my mystery on the grounds that I didn’t murder anyone until just over a hundred pages into the story.

I felt bad, naturally, but at the same time, something in me rebelled. Over the years I had read a great many detective novels and mysteries, and, although at the moment, I couldn’t offer book and page number, I was pretty certain my publisher’s theory was in error. I was almost certain I had read many crime novels, be it private eye tales or police procedurals,  in which a murder didn’t occur until later in the book.

Okay, I got over it and moved on.  A bit later I  found a new publisher.

But the other day I chanced to pick up a tattered old novel by Ngaio Marsh, arguably one of the true queens of mystery fiction, and decided to read it. In this particular novel, “Tied up in Tinsel”, we don’t stumble across a body until page 242 in a book that has only 286 pages. Wow! Obviously, the editor who rejected my little novel also would have thrown Ms Marsh’s effort into the circular file and in her disgust, she might well have sent Ms Marsh a stern message about the way to write mysteries. Too bad for an editor who had made up her mind about what constitutes a mystery novel. But reading the book and remembering the editor’s remarks, the entire incident poured back into my mind and I got all wound up again.

All this the above is a prelude to my remarks that in novel writing, there are no rules. The very word novel conjures up images of something new and different. Now a mystery novel with no murder might not go over well with readers, starting with editors, but still it is legal. There’s no law that says you have to have a murder. A short story, maybe. Remember “The Purloined Letter” by Mr. Poe.

In “Vanity Fair”, Thackeray talks frankly, to his reader. He knows it’s just a story and he knows the reader knows it’s just a story, so tongue in cheek, he goes ahead and tells it, stepping in from time to time to remind us that, after all, it’s just a story.

Fowles puts himself right into the background of a novel while observing the proceedings and of course, in my favorite mystery novels, the narrator, the detective, tells his story as he remembers it. He’s just a reporter giving us, as Sgt. Friday would say, the facts. He’s not the real author of course, but we can suspend belief and assume that private eye Raymond Chandler is just calling himself Philip Marlowe to avoid being stalked by beautiful women with pearl-handled .25 automatics in their handbags.

In fact, being a very young reader when I began reading Marlowe novels, I was severely traumatized to learn one day that Mr. Chandler was in his sixties, meaning Marlowe was in his sixties. Philip Marlowe kicking butt in his sixties? To me, a kid of sixteen, I couldn’t believe anybody in his sixties was still able to walk, much less kick butt or write about the butts he kicked. And I felt very betrayed, almost the victim of a bad joke. But I was a vapid youth of sixteen. Maybe only fifteen.

Most people today lack the patience to wade through “Moby Dick”, but when it was written, I believe people liked a more leisurely novel, something they could spend hours, even days on. They wanted their money’s worth. Remember, at that time there wasn’t much else in the way of entertainment, at least not in that price range. But today what editor would accept a long tedious novel that stops cold, and before continuing, offers lengthy dissertations on whaling, or any other industry?

If there is anything to be gleaned from this little outburst, it is that as author, you are God. Rules, schmules, it’s your creation and you have the right to say anything you want to. Now if you step too far out of recognized lines, you may never find a publisher, but these days with the Internet and self-publishing opportunities being offered every time you log on, you can still get your stuff published.

Now, I don’t suggest you go too far off the grid if you hope to find a traditional publisher who is willing to take a chance on your work, but I do feel that, as the writer, you still have the right so say what you want to.

I should mention that what makes books  like Moby Dick, Sherlock Holmes, Don Quixote, etc. isn’t always their construction, but their unforgettable characters. Remember that.

So the takeaway here is to write what you want to. Once you’ve written it, you might want to see how it compares with similar works. If you feel it’s a little outré in some respect or another, you might want to make a few changes. If you like it the way it is, submit it and see what comes out of that. BIG PUBLISHERS probably won’t look at your masterpiece no matter what it is, but there are a great many independent publishers now. Most of them are open to unpublished writers and if all of these reject your stuff, you may want to revisit the entire work and see what’s holding you back. If you do get feedback, by all means, listen to it. Listen to it, but you don’t have to do more than that. It’s up to you. You’re the writer.

In my case, hearing about the rule that the murder should happen on page three or thereabouts, I nevertheless stubbornly felt I was okay with what I had written and time has proven me to be correct, insofar that another publisher accepted Deadly Reception, and I haven’t had any complaints. So you just have to consider what you’ve written and if you firmly believe you’re right, then stick to it. Sooner or later you’ll connect with the right publisher and hopefully you’ll establish a good relationship.

One last thing that may give you solace: If and when you do get some BIG PUBLISHER to publish your book, you’ll have a very short window of opportunity. If sales after a couple of months or so aren’t what the publisher wants, off with your books head (or cover). It’s gone. Buried without any ceremony, and all you’ll have are the few copies sitting your shelf to remind you that you once had a book published. As an added humiliation, if you’re really unlucky, you may stumble across a few copies of your book in Big Lots or a 99c store but let’s hope that doesn’t happen to you.

If you allow them, most of the indies will keep your book on the Internet forever. You may not sell a lot of POD copies because of the cost, but your masterpiece can float around as an E-book on Kindle, Nook and so on forever and who knows? Maybe one day, like Van Gogh, you’ll be DISCOVERED! Hey, if Picasso and Warhol can be “discovered”, anything can happen.

Editor

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Raymond Chandler

A l’âge de 70 ans, Raymond Chandler écrivit son roman « Playback », c’est connu. Ce qui n’est possiblement pas connu, c’est qu’avant qu’il n’écrive ce roman, à l’époque où il se trouvait dans l’emploi d’Universal Studios, il avait écrit un script.« Playback ».  Attention : Bien que M. Chandler ait écrit le scénario, ce n’est pas un récit Philip Marlowe.

Malheureusement, « The suits » (les cadres) n’aimaient pas le script, et le film n’a jamais été tourné.

Deçu par la reception mitigée de son scénario, M. Chandler l’avait complètement changé en un roman Marlowe comme ça. Allez donc comprendre !

S’il t’intéresse pourtant, tu peux télécharger le script gratuitement ici :

http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/playback

(en angliche, bien entendu).

Bonne lecture !

Le goret qui rit, C. M. Albrecht http://theinvestigators.webs.com

 

Raymond Chandler

<strong><span style=”font-size:small;”>A</span></strong> l’âge de 70 ans, Raymond Chandler écrivit son roman « Playback », c’est connu. Ce qui n’est <a href=”https://cmalbrecht.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/r-chandler2.jpg”><img class=”alignright size-full wp-image-398″ title=”R. Chandler” src=”https://cmalbrecht.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/r-chandler2.jpg&#8221; alt=”” width=”187″ height=”269″ /></a>possiblement pas connu, c’est qu’avant qu’il n’écrive ce roman, à l’époque où il se trouvait dans l’emploi d’Universal Studios, il avait écrit un script.« Playback ».  Attention : Bien que M. Chandler ait écrit le scénario, ce n’est pas un récit Philip Marlowe.

Malheureusement, « The suits » (les cadres) n’aimaient pas le script, et le film n’a jamais été tourné.

Deçu par la reception mitigée de son scénario, M. Chandler l’avait complètement changé en un roman Marlowe comme ça. Allez donc comprendre !

S’il t’intéresse pourtant, tu peux télécharger le script gratuitement ici :

http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/playback (en angliches, bien entendu) Bonne lecture !

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THE MORGENSTERN MURDERS

In this sequel to The Sand Bluff Murders, former police chief Jonas McCleary has gone into business as a private investigator.

When a prominent surgeon and his wife are murdered, the family’s daughter comes under suspicion and in order to clear her name and track down the killers of her parents, she hires Jonas to investigate.

When she dangles a five-thousand dollar check under his nose, how can Jonas say no? He doesn’t promise to clear her name, but he does promise to do the best he can to bring out the facts whatever they may be.

But Jonas has a rough road ahead of him when another person is found dead and the mystery surrounding the case only deepens.

In the end Jonas may have to lay his life on the line to bring this case to a satisfactory conclusion.

From Write Words, Inc. Cambridge Books http://www.writewordsinc.com

“This is one of those books that will keep you guessing all the way to the end.  Loved it and can’t wait for the next Jonas McCleary to hit my hands.”

— Martha Cheves “Stir, Laugh, Repeat”

Un polar un peu pas comme les autres. Vous m’en direz des nouvelles. http://www.writewordsinc.com (Cambridge Books) En angliche, bien entendu.

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